Tuesday, 28 April 2015

DESKTOP 637 - GUM TREES

Eucalyptus is a diverse genus of flowering trees and shrubs (including a distinct group with a multiple-stem mallee growth habit) in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae. Members of the genus dominate the tree flora of Australia. There are more than 700 species of eucalyptus, mostly native to Australia, and a very small number are found in adjacent areas of New Guinea and Indonesia. One species, Eucalyptus deglupta, ranges as far north as the Philippines. Only fifteen species occur outside Australia, with just nine of these not occurring in Australia.
 

Species of eucalyptus are cultivated widely in the tropical and temperate world, including the Americas, Europe, Africa, the Mediterranean Basin, the Middle East, China and the Indian Subcontinent, though most species do not tolerate frost. In Australia, many of the eucalypts are called "gum trees".

This post is part of the Our World Tuesday meme,
and also part of the Trees & Bushes meme,
and also part of the Wordless Wednesday meme.

5 comments:

  1. Wild and wonderful - thanks for sharing at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/04/french-corner-bakery.html!

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  2. Are they called Gum Trees for a reason? Like do they ooze a gummy substance? This is a beautiful picture ... all that is missing is a little Koala Bear snoozing in it's branches :) Love that you give us so much information, Nick, along with your awesome photography. Have a great rest of your week :)

    Andrea @ From The Sol

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    1. Thanks Andrea. In 1688 explorer William Dampier noted that trees in north west Australia exuded a type of gum. Aborigines used this gum to fasten barbs to the ends of spears and fishing sticks. The exudation from the bark which looks like a ‘gum’ is actually a tannin-like substance known as ‘kino’. Governor Arthur Philip is credited with being the first to call the eucalypt a ‘gum tree’ in 1788. Since then most Australians have called eucalypts ‘gum trees’. There is nothing more Australian than a ‘gum tree’!

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  3. Beautiful trees! So interesting!

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  4. Did not know you had this kind of trees in Australia. I like the look of it too. Nice trunk :)

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